Thursday, October 29, 2015

Feeling gloomy on weakening global economy


I am most gloomy about the prospects of the global economy but that doesn't mean the markets will go down.

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

China government economic reports contradicting each other


Tuesday, October 20, 2015

People should not have all their money in cash

The economic recovery in the US began in June 2009, so we are six years into an economic expansion, and this is historically the third longest expansion. We have been six years, March 2009 low S&P 666, where it went over 2100 so we are over 6 years into bull market, then I say to myself, I see the global economy weakening and I see French, Italian and Spanish bond yields lower than US treasury yields so with the view that most people have that the US dollar will remain relatively strong, I say to myself everybody is bullish about stocks in the US and everybody is bearish about bonds.

I say to myself maybe treasury notes, the ten years and the thirty years as an investment for the next 3 to 6 months is maybe not so bad. Then I also advocate in my investment strategy, always diversification between real estate, equities, bonds, cash and precious metals. And if someone comes to me and says Marc you are bearish about the world, shouldn’t you be all in cash?

I say yes, maybe that is correct except if I put all my money in cash with the banking system I take a huge risk because we have seen it in the case of Greece, we have seen it in the case of Cyprus and now they have announced that basically investors if there is again a crisis they will also have to pay something so if you have say 20 million dollars with the banks, and they have a problem, maybe you will only get 50% back. So I say to myself, rather than have the money in the banks I would have it in treasuries.

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Markets could crash and stock prices could go much lower



Markets may not crash right away but its possible that it will.....

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Gloom Boom Doom October 2015 Report

The late Kurt Richeb├Ącher opined that, “Capital and wealth increases when a community produces more than it consumes. Capital and wealth decreases when the community consumes more than it produces. What is happening in the United States is the latter - with the consequences of general impoverishment.” In an earlier report I explained how Friedrich Hayek gained fame among English-speaking economists at the London School of Economics in 1931, because he made the distinction in the use of credit for investment or consumption his key theme. At the time he explained in detail how excessive consumer spending brings about “a shortening or shrinking of the production” and so causes recession. What shrinks is the economy’s capital base. In essence, production that uses capital gives way to production using little or no capital. In other words, the whole economy adjusts to the changes in the pattern of demand implemented by the credit excess. Looking at changes in employment in the US over the years, I note that employment in capital-intensive manufacturing has plummeted, while employment in all kinds of low-paying services has soared.  

There is a difference between excessive credit growth (defined as an “increase in money capital from credits which do not originate from savings but are created out of nothing through the banking system”) flowing into capital investments, and excessive credit growth flowing into asset inflation and financing consumption. Once the boom comes to an end, the severity of the downturn can be equally severe (most likely more severe in the case of a capital spending boom), but the capital spending boom leaves the entire system with investments such as railroads, canals, and other infrastructures, and new technologies. It is a well-documented fact that all canal companies, including the most successful of them all, the Erie Canal Company, went bust. Equally, by 1895, 95% of all US railroads were either in default or bankrupt; however, the transportation network that had been built by the canal and railroad companies was a huge boon to the expansion of commerce and trade within the American continent.

Similarly I would argue that, while there certainly has been capital spending excesses in China, at least there is now infrastructure in place whereas there was none 20 years ago (unlike in India, where infrastructure is still decrepit and extremely poor). On the contrary, in the case of an asset boom and excessive credit creation which financed consumption, the system is left with hardly any new capital structures but an over-indebted consumer. In addition, consumer credit allowed the consumer to advance consumption, which then leads to reduced demand once the consumer exhausts his borrowing capacity (as is now the case for the majority of American families).

This report explains why under current fiscal and monetary policies the global economy will likely enter a recessionary phase and why equities will unlikely perform well. 

Sunday, October 4, 2015

Donald Trump is not a genius

In my view, you know you look at Trump, Donald Trump is no genius or anything, and he is not a particularly honest person either because his investors that bought bonds that were issued by his companies, most of them lost money, but he touches on one point, and this is a great dissatisfaction of the American of the typical American with his government.